Come one come all (21 and up thank you!!) to the upcoming Adult Puppet Cabaret- held in the historic Marie Hitchcock Puppet Theatre in Balboa Park. Join us From 7-10 pm June 16th 2017 for an amazing night of puppet making for adults, short form puppetry for adult audiences as well as some offerings from deep in left field. Come early for a tasty libation and make your own masterpiece of puppetry for use in our always entertaining Puppet-E-Oke audience participation! tickets are $12 online and $15 at the door, and partial proceeds will go to upgrading the Marie Hitchcock and elevating a part of San Diego History! http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/2969501 

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Animal Cracker Conspiracy

Adult: A person who has stopped growing at both ends and is now growing in the 
middle.

Puppet: an inanimate object, often resembling some type of human, animal or mythical figure, that is animated or manipulated by a human called a puppeteer. The puppeteer uses movements of her hands, arms, or control devices such as rods or strings to move the body, head, limbs, and in some cases the mouth and eyes of the puppet. The puppeteer often speaks in the voice of the character of the puppet, and then synchronizes the movements of the puppet's mouth with this spoken part. The actions, gestures and spoken parts acted out by the puppeteer with the puppet are typically used in storytelling. Puppetry is a very ancient form of theatre which dates back to the 5th century BC in Ancient Greece. There are many different varieties of puppets, and they are made of a wide range of materials, depending on their form and intended use. They can be extremely complex or very simple in their construction.
​​Cabaret: Cabaret has its origins in 19th-century Paris, at Le Chat Noir, where musicians and poets performed in a casual atmosphere where people felt free to eat and drink. The word and descriptions of cabaret are derived from the French word meaning "wine cellar" to describe the small room where this form of entertainment was born. Over time, European cabaret evolved into a number of forms, including comedy, burlesque and sociopolitical satire.In America, cabaret was performed in speakeasies and other intimate nightclub venues and evolved into a much more jazz-infused style of performance. New York City nightclubs, like the Cafe Carlyle, feature singers associated with music from a genre known as the Great American Songbook.Today, cabaret is its own, identifiable art form, distinctive from musical theatre, nightclub singing, or a concert. The most essential elements of cabaret are simple: a performer in a small room with an audience at close range, seated around cozy tables, with the performer mere feet from the audience.